After a divorce, there may be times when you need to address changes in your custody arrangements, alimony or other aspects of your divorce agreements. If that’s the case, then you will need to ask for a post-decree modification.

A post-decree modification asks a judge to look at a situation and change something about the original divorce decree. For example, a change to do with spousal support or alimony might be requested when an ex-spouse gets remarried. The judge would then look at the request and the facts of the case and release the party paying spousal support from further payments.

Similarly, a parent might ask for a custody modification as a child gets older. They might have a new job or have to change custody to help their child go to a better school. If a parent changes to a job further from home, a modification may even be sought to request more custody or a change in the custody schedule, so the child could also go with them.

What should you do if you want to seek a modification after your divorce is finalized?

Talk to your attorney if you’re interested in obtaining a post-decree modification. Some of the things you’ll need include:

  • Documented supporting evidence for why you want to change your divorce decree agreements (the new job paperwork, a marriage certificate)
  • Support for your requests, such as witness statements or testimonies

Your attorney will help you fill out the appropriate paperwork, so you can ask for a modification that will help you get the changes you want.